Final Projects Webinar

join-the-webinar

After 6 months of dedicated and sleepless nights, we finally pressed that button “Submit” on the TurnItin Site and clicked ‘send’ to the IWC assessment email address! It has been more than three months but those feelings of achievement and relief are still fresh in the minds of many of us.

To keep the momentum, we have set up an online live Webinar to share what we have learned from this journey with our fellow cohorts, the current MIWM students, MIWM alumni members, fellow water resources management students in UNESCO-IHE, Delft, Holland who are about to embark on this journey and everyone around the world who share our passion in making a difference in achieving sustainable water management.

IWCAN_Logo
Webinar_Header_S4

Prior to the Webinar:
– Please check what the day/time it will be at your location by clicking here, if it is not among the list above.
– Please test your connection by clicking here. Abobe Flash Player of version 10.1 or later is required.

At the time of the Webinar:
– Please join our webinar at meet.uq.edu.au/grad_webinar.
– Select “Enter as a Guest“, type in your full name and click “Enter Room“.
– Click “OK” on the next screen to join the Webinar.

Photo_Veronica

View Veronica's profile on LinkedIn

 

Current Practices Of Animal Farming, Community Habits And Water Scarcity: A Different Approach For The Global Water Issues

by Veronica Gallardo Reinoso (Ecuador)

From nature depletion to global warming, it is undeniable that the world, as we know it, is changing. Every single one of our daily activities has a repercussion on the environment and on water. It is true that taking shorter showers and riding a bike to our work places can contribute to diminish environmental issues, however, how is the impact of these changes in comparison to what we could achieve by modifying they way we produce food and the kind of food we eat? This project proposes an introspection of our traditions and habits, studying social and educational challenges of a behavioural change towards sustainable food choices.

 

Photo_Sharon

View Sharon's profile on LinkedIn

 

Tending the Gardens: Promoting Efficient Usage of Water Resources to Meet Irrigation Demand By Assessment of Water Management Practices in Brisbane City Community Gardens

by Sharon Karlesky (USA)

The purpose of this study project is to promote efficient water resources usage in Brisbane City community gardens by assessing water management practices in the gardens. The aim of the project is, through the assessment, to understand the challenges and obstacles garden managers face when meeting irrigation demand, in order to inform water management options for sustainable water management practices that lead to efficient water resources usage.

 

Learn more about the MIWM Program: Master of Integrated Water Management
IWCAN_Logo
Webinar_Header_S4

Prior to the Webinar:
– Please check what the day/time it will be at your location by clicking here, if it is not among the list above.
– Please test your connection by clicking here. Abobe Flash Player of version 10.1 or later is required.

At the time of the Webinar:
– Please join our webinar at meet.uq.edu.au/grad_webinar.
– Select “Enter as a Guest“, type in your full name and click “Enter Room“.
– Click “OK” on the next screen to join the Webinar.

Photo_Paola

View Paola's profile on LinkedIn

 

Using Indigenous Knowledge as a Tool for Water Management: Miskito People, Nicaragua

by Paola San Martin (Honduras)

This study revolves around the Miskito Indians in Nicaragua. It aims to explore their traditional knowledge, cosmovision, ideas and beliefs towards the conservation and management processes around water and land; focusing especially on how this body of knowledge complement integrated water resources management (IWRM). Findings show that Miskito villages, livelihood, transportation and food gathering activities are intimately tied to water and land. Based on these profound interactions with the environment, Indigenous people have acquired valuable knowledge on how to manage their resources. There is a need to provide a ‘third space’ for cross cultural divisions that can allow a safe space for dialogue or negotiation. This space can be filled by developing an adapted basin planning governance institution which can act as a hybrid model where indigenous authorities, water users, women, government, NGO and industries can come together and share their knowledge and world views in order to develop a plan with a common interest around the management of the basin.

 

Photo_Rodrigo

View Rodrigo's profile on LinkedIn

 

Water Supply Vulnerability and Adaptation under Climate Change Scenarios: A Case Study in Central Chile

by Rodrigo Correa (Chile)

Integrated water management has been recognised as one of the key factors for adapting to climate change. In order to assess future impacts of climate change in a particular catchment a hydrologic model has been developed that utilises a number of climate change scenarios based on a regional climate model.This research explores a case study of a mining operation (Andina) located at the Blanco River’s headwater in Central Chile, where competition among water users is high and predictive models are needed in order to plan future developments and design adaptation strategies. The model suggests that Andina is in a high risk position and it needs to improve its water management plan in order to face the current water challenges that may threaten the continual operation during dry years.

 

Learn more about the MIWM Program: Master of Integrated Water Management
IWCAN_Logo
Webinar_Header_S2

Prior to the Webinar:
– Please check what the day/time it will be at your location by clicking here, if it is not among the list above.
– Please test your connection by clicking here. Abobe Flash Player of version 10.1 or later is required.

At the time of the Webinar:
– Please join our webinar at meet.uq.edu.au/grad_webinar.
– Select “Enter as a Guest“, type in your full name and click “Enter Room“.
– Click “OK” on the next screen to join the Webinar.

Photo_Vanh

View Vanh's profile on LinkedIn

 

Analysis of Strategies for Emerging Leaders in Lao PDR to achieve Integrated Urban Wastewater Management

by Vanh Mixap (Lao PDR)

Drawing on the principle of integrated urban water management, this thesis demonstrates the need for collaboration and coordination between the water and energy sectors in urban wastewater management in Lao PDR. The realisation of the need for collaboration alone, however, is not sufficient, without having the individuals involved to turn the ideas into action. This thesis aims to provide the emerging leaders in Lao PDR with strategies they could use in moving from the ‘information and ideas’ stage to ‘implementation and action’ stage.

 

Photo_Annie

View Annie's profile on LinkedIn

 

Applying the South East Queensland Healthy Waterways Model in Pearl River Delta, China – A Business Case Approach

by Annie Chan (Macao)

The project aimed to develop and promote a business case approach to apply the South East Queensland Healthy Waterways Model in the Pearl River Delta. As in the whole country of China, the Pearl River Delta is confronted with serious aquatic health problems due to the rapid growth in population and economy. Findings from the project show that both Integrated Water Management and the South East Queensland Healthy Waterways Model have implications for establishing a collaborative water monitoring and management system in the Pearl River Delta, and that a business case approach may help kick off the first initiative. One highlight of the project was the delivery of a workshop as an action research to assess qualitatively the feasibility of the approach.

 

Learn more about the MIWM Program: Master of Integrated Water Management
Webinar_Header_S2

Prior to the Webinar:
– Please check what the day/time it will be at your location by clicking here, if it is not among the list above.
– Please test your connection by clicking here. Abobe Flash Player of version 10.1 or later is required.

At the time of the Webinar:
– Please join our webinar at meet.uq.edu.au/grad_webinar.
– Select “Enter as a Guest“, type in your full name and click “Enter Room“.
– Click “OK” on the next screen to join the Webinar.

Photo_Ben

View Ben's profile on LinkedIn

 

Improving Accountability in Water and Sanitation Service Provision in the Context of WaterAid’s Work in Nepal

by Ben Cartwright (UK)

The overall purpose of this research is to contribute to global water security through a better understanding of how accountability in water and sanitation provision can be improved. The research was structured around two parts. Firstly, a desk study was undertaken in WaterAid offices in the UK and Nepal to become familiar with WaterAid staff and processes, to review literature and to understand the Nepalese context. The literature review helped formulate existing definitions and models of accountability and to understand gaps in research that were used to inform and prepare for a field study. The field study in Nepal focused around the work of one of WaterAid’s partners, a civil society organisation called FEDWASUN. This research shows that water and sanitation services in Nepal are often delivered through contracts that incentivise upward accountability and there is a reliance on voluntary user groups to represent all citizens. The research process also highlighted how difficult it is to measure accountability when it is a social process to do with power and responsibility and not necessarily attributed with any one sector or body.

 

Photo_Keigo

View Diana's profile on LinkedIn

 

Production of Agricultural Biosolids Products by SEQ Water

by Keigo Tsushima (Japan)

This project seeks to facilitate the better management of biosolids for water utilities in Queensland (QLD). Firstly, a conceptual model for biosolids management was developed based on manufacturing industries to identify key functions such as production, sales, marketing and logistics. Secondly, in order to obtain accurate and updated information, interviews were conducted with QLD water utilities and successful biosolids management case in Melbourne. Finally, the obtained details were analysed using a SWOT analysis tool to develop strategic recommendations to QLD water utilities. A significant lesson within this research project is the opportunities associated with the production of compost.

WEBINAR 1: October 1st 2015

Photo_Suzanne

View Suzanne's profile on LinkedIn

 

How has urban metabolism been interpreted and communicated?

by Suzanne King (USA)

Urban metabolism studies provide quantification of the resource flows of a city, show how the circulation of flows within a city system operate and evaluate the environmental impacts. Stakeholder participation is a key principle of Integrated Urban Water Management (IUWM), making effective communication crucial for sustainable water management. Consequently, this study aimed to answer the question driving the research: how has urban metabolism has been interpreted and communicated? The study included qualitative interviews with nine urban metabolism experts across three continents (North America, Europe and Australia). The research identified a major gap in shared understanding and stakeholder participation. While urban metabolism has the potential to account for urban water flows from an integrated system approach, a dialogue with all stakeholders is recommended for moving beyond expert circles and upholding IUWM principles. Water communication translators or knowledge transfer experts could facilitate the co-production of knowledge among all stakeholders in order to move urban metabolism forward within and outside expert circles towards IUWM.

 

Photo_Diana

View Diana's profile on LinkedIn

 

Situation Analysis: Faecal Sludge Management in Costa Rican Illegal Settlements

by Diana Madrigal (Costa Rica)

The project focused on Faecal Sludge Management (FSM). The research aimed to analyse the FSM situation in informal Costa Rican settlements where a high percentage of the population uses on-site sanitation systems. In order to develop the project, political, economical and institutional desktop research was undertaken, followed by field research in three informal settlements in Costa Rica. The collaboration of settlement dwellers, faecal sludge vacuuming truck drivers and representatives of public institutions was key to develop and finalise the research.

 

Photo_Amira

 

The evolution of monitoring: using IWRM to link science, monitoring and management to make Integrated Monitoring a reality

by Amira Pérez (Mexico)

In this project traditional water quality monitoring techniques and toxicity assessment approaches were evaluated to determine the degree to which new developments in techniques and scientific knowledge might be able to improve our approach to environmental monitoring. The approaches assessed included: 1) monitoring of water quality parameters; 2) monitoring using bio-indicators; 3) in vitro toxicity tests and 4) in vivo toxicity tests. Whilst there are no current water monitoring and management programs that use all of these approaches, it was found that each have the potential to improve monitoring schemes and together they can address most current chemical-water pollutant concerns.

 

\

One Comment

  1. Pingback: 2015 Final Projects Webinar Series Schedule - International WaterCentre Alumni Network International WaterCentre Alumni Network

Leave a Reply